2011 Archives

February 2nd, 2013

 

URGENT ACTION:   SAUDI MEN SENTENCED TO AMPUTATION Amnesty   15 December 2011   Six men have been sentenced by the General Court in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, to amputation of their right hands and left feet for “highway robbery”. Their sentence was reportedly upheld by a court of appeal in October and is due to be approved at any moment by the Supreme Court, placing them at risk of amputation.  More…

Amnesty reports:    Saudi Arabia: Beheading for ‘sorcery’ shocking  12 December 2011  The beheading of a woman convicted of “witchcraft and sorcery” is deeply shocking and highlights the urgent need for a halt in executions in Saudi Arabia, Amnesty International said today.   The number of executions in Saudi Arabia has almost tripled this year. So far at least 79 people – including five women – have been executed there, compared to at least 27 in 2010.  More…   in Arabic in English

HRFS is on the SRLAN Website: The Southern Refugee Legal Aid Network (SRLAN) More…

ACPRA Calls for A 48-Hour Hunger Strike to End Arbitrary Detention, Demand Rule of Law, and Show Solidarity with Arbitrary Detention Victims in Saudi Prisons More…

Saudi Arabia executes eight Bangladeshi nationals: Executions have resumed in Saudi Arabia at an alarming rate since Ramadan. Amnesty International 7 October 2011 More…

Saudi Arabia: Saudi human rights activist rearrested 13 October 2011  Human rights activist Fadhel Maki al-Manasif was rearrested on 2 October 2011 in the Eastern Province in Saudi Arabia, less then two months after his release. He is believed to be held in virtual incommunicado detention, putting him at risk of torture or other ill-treatment.   More. . .

Men-Only Election Shows Limits of Saudi Reply to Arab Spring By Glen Carey  Sept. 29 (Bloomberg) — Saudi Arabia excluded most adult citizens from today’s municipal elections, betting that a limited ballot coupled with $130 billion of extra spending will be enough to halt Arab unrest at the kingdom’s borders.

Women weren’t entitled to stand as candidates or cast votes in the ballot, which closed at 5 p.m. local time, and the councilors chosen by Saudi men age 21 and over who aren’t in the military will enjoy few powers. Still, the fact that the ballot took place is an advance from two years ago, when the election was first due and King Abdullah postponed it.

Saudi women will be allowed to join in the next election, due in 2015, as voters and candidates, King Abdullah said this week. Abdullah, born in 1924, has promised to improve the status of women and opened the first co-educational university in 2009.

After the king’s decision, Ibrahim al-Mugaiteeb, president of the Human Rights First Society, who had earlier said he didn’t plan to vote, changed his mind. “I am going to a polling station this morning because the king allowed women to participate in the next municipal elections,” he said in a phone interview.More…

Saudi Woman Driver Sentenced to Lash After King Grants Vote

By Donna Abu-Nasr

Sept. 28 (Bloomberg) — Two days after Saudi King Abdullah’s decision to allow women to participate in elections, two Saudi women were punished for breaking the ban on female driving: One was sentenced to 10 lashes by a court in Jeddah and another was detained in Riyadh.

The incidents highlight the continuing disparity between the rights of men and women in the kingdom. Women may be able to vote and run in the 2015 municipal elections, but they still can’t drive, argue in court before a judge, travel or get an education or a job without male approval.  More…

Iraqi Man Executed:  Saudi Arabia AMNESTY  Muhammad bin Abd Rab al-Amir bin Ali al-Shammari (previously spelled Mohammad Abdul Amir) an Iraqi national aged 36, was arrested in 1995 and charged with the murder of a Saudi Arabian man. He was executed in the town of on Arar, near Saudi Arabia’s border with Iraq, on 23 November.  More…

Lengthy Sentences for Reformers:  Saudi Arabia AMNESTY Lengthy prison sentences given to 16 men, among them prominent advocates of reform who had tried to set up a human rights association in Saudi Arabia, are a worrying development, Amnesty International said today. According to reports, prison sentences handed out by the Specialized Criminal Court in Riyadh on Tuesday ranged from five to 30 years.  The men were convicted of charges including forming a secret organization, attempting to seize power, incitement against the King, financing terrorism, and money laundering.  “While some of these charges look very serious, the authorities have a track record of punishing people who simply advocate peaceful political change and respect for human rights, labelling them as security threats,” said Philip Luther, Amnesty International’s Acting Director for the Middle East and North Africa.  “Given that the trial proceedings in this case were grossly unfair and many of the accusations against the men related only to the peaceful exercise of their rights to freedom of expression and association, it is likely that at least some of those sentenced are prisoners of conscience.” More…

King Abdullah Gives Saudi Women Right to Vote for First Time  September 26, 2011 (Bloomberg) — Saudi Arabia granted women the right to vote for the first time in its modern history as part of changes King Abdullah said will let them run in future municipal elections.

“We hope that with Saudi women going to the municipal council, they will be able to drive in the future,” Ibrahim al- Mugaiteeb, president of the Human Rights First Society, said in a phone interview from al-Khobar in eastern Saudi Arabia yesterday. “It is a huge step forward.” More …

HRFS supports Wajeeha Alhwaider for the Presidency of the Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA.) HRFS received the pleasant news that Mrs. Wajeeha Alhwaider has nominated herself for the Presidency of FIFA.  HRFS believes that Wajeeha’s leadership of FIFA will have monumental implications on the status of women in Saudi Arabia and Islamic countries and peak manifestation for empowering women around the world. Read More Details…

Amnesty International website ‘blocked in Saudi Arabia 25 July 2011  Access to Amnesty International’s website has been blocked in Saudi Arabia today following the organization’s criticism of a draft anti-terror law that would stifle peaceful protest in the kingdom. More…

July 22, 2011 Amnesty International: Saudi Terror Law and Petition   Proposed Saudi Arabian terror law would strangle peaceful protest.  This law, if enacted, would allow the authorities to prosecute peaceful dissent as a terrorist crime. Click here to read their moving accounts.

July 22, 2011 (Reuters)   Amnesty International accused Saudi Arabia of planning a crackdown on public dissent with new anti-terror legislation that it said was a cover to stop further pro-democracy protests in the absolute monarchy. More…

July 23, 2011 Rights Group Condemns Draft Saudi Antiterror Law by Summer Said. Wall Street Journal “This draft law is a disaster for human rights. It is not directed to fight terrorism, but rather to fight all sorts of activism in the kingdom,” said Ibrahim Almugaiteeb, who heads the Human Rights First Society. More…

Abolish the death penalty The death penalty is the ultimate denial of human rights. . More… in English in Arabic

THE WOMEN HAVE BEEN RELEASED Saudi Arabia detains women protestors by Jon Rawlinson of Amensty.  4 July 2011  Two women remain in detention after being arrested in Riyadh on Sunday during a protest to demand fair trials for their relatives, sources told Amnesty International on Monday. More…

Women activists prepare to defy Saudi Arabian driving ban 16 June 2011  Amnesty International –  Saudi Arabian authorities must stop treating women as second-class citizens and open the Kingdom’s roads to women drivers, Amnesty International said today, as a group of Saudi Arabian women prepared to defy a decades-old ban on women driving. More…

Saudi Arabia urged to release woman arrested following driving campaign (AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL) 24 May 2011   Saudi Arabian women face severe discrimination in many areas of their lives   The Saudi Arabian authorities must release a woman detained for her involvement in campaigning against the ban on women driving in the Kingdom, Amnesty International said today.   More in Arabic… More in English…

Saudi Police Detain Female Activist for Driving Car in Al-Khobar

By Glen Carey and Mourad Haroutunian – May 22, 2011

Saudi Arabian traffic and religious police detained a female activist for driving a car in al-Khobar in the kingdom’s Eastern Province on the Persian Gulf, according to an activist.

Manal al-Sharif, 32, was detained for six hours yesterday then released, Ibrahim al-Mugaiteeb, president of the Human Rights First Society, based in al-Khobar, said in a phone interview today.

In Saudi Arabia, which enforces the Wahhabi version of Sunni Islam, women aren’t allowed to have a Saudi driver’s permit. They can’t travel or get an education without male approval or mix with unrelated men in public places and aren’t permitted to vote in municipal elections scheduled on Sept. 29.  More…

Speaking Truth to Power  May 18, 2011 Foreign Policy

Activists from around the Middle East tell FP what they’d like to hear from Obama’s speech on Thursday.

From Saudi Arabia:  Ibrahim Almugaiteeb ,  Director, Human Rights First Society of Saudi Arabia

What did you learn about the United States’ foreign policy in its response to events in your country?

The foreign policy of the United States has not been consistent with U.S. ideals.

I would like to see President Obama stand by the values and principles of the United States as the Founding Fathers viewed the issues of freedoms and democracy. Consequently the president should be calling for full respect of human rights and to freedoms for the Saudi people including, but not limited to, respect for the rule of law, freedom of association, gender equality, stopping all kinds of discrimination against religious minorities in Saudi Arabia, and, finally, for full freedom of expression including the right of the Saudi people to peaceful demonstrations. More activists’ responses…

Amnesty International Annual Report 2011 – Saudi Arabia issued May 13, 2011. Read Report.

 

Saudi Arabia’s ‘Day of Rage’: One year on AMNESTY  One year on from a planned “Day of Rage” demonstration in the capital, Riyadh, on 11 March 2011, the Saudi Arabian authorities continue to detain at least six individuals arrested on or in the lead-up to that date. The continuing detention of these individuals arrested a year ago in Riyadh comes in a context in which hundreds of others have been arrested in recent months for protesting or voicing their opposition to government policies, many in the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia, where most of the country’s Shi’a minority lives. Most have been released without charge; others remain in detention without charge or trial; and others still have been charged with vague security-related and other offences. Others who protested or attempted to protest in Saudi Arabia in previous year also remain in detention. More…

 

URGENT:  Immediate Freedom for the Writer and Intellectual Alsaeed Natheer Almajid On Sunday, April 17, 2011  Saudi security forces arrested Alsaeed Natheer Almajid from his workplace.   Human Rights First Society strongly condemns this aggression by the Saudi security apparatus.  More…

Saudi Arabia arrests Shi’ite writer after protests DUBAI | Tue Apr 19, 2011 2:41pm (Reuters) – Saudi authorities have arrested a Shi’ite Muslim intellectual in the oil-producing eastern province where minority Shi’ites have staged protests in the strict Sunni kingdom, human rights activists said on Tuesday. Security forces arrested al-Saeed al-Majid, a Shi’ite writer, on Sunday at his workplace in Khobar on the Gulf coast, the independent Human Rights First Society said in a statement. Shi’ite website Rasid.com confirmed the arrest.  Saudi authorities were not immediately available for comment.  More…

HRFS strongly condemns excluding women from voting and running in the upcoming Municipality Elections HRFS was stunned by the announcement of the Saudi government about the upcoming Municipality Elections on April 23, 2011 where no amendment to the existing laws prohibiting wome n from voting and running in these elections was presented. More…

National Declaration for Reform Hundreds of Saudi intellectuals, political activists, human rights activists and a wide variety of others from Saudi society propose a comprehensive package for immediate reforms leading to a full constitutional monarchy. More…

Amnesty International has released a new report Saudi Arabia: Repression in the name of SecurityThe report covers the crackdown on protests since early 2011, including those demanding political reforms and those calling for the release of their relatives detained without charge or trial for years in the context of the “war on terror.” It also includes detailed analysis of its concerns about the leaked secret draft anti-terror law that Amnesty International published in July 2011. This report also follows up on the issues covered in Amnesty International’s 2009 publication,Saudi Arabia: Assaulting human rights in the name of counter-terrorism, updating cases and trials covered in that report, and including information on new cases that have emerged since 2009. Report  in Arabic … in English

Saudi Arabia: Dissident Writer Arrested EU, US Leaders Should Publicly Condemn Human Rights Violations  (HRW) April 20, 2011  More…  in English in Arabic

Saudi activists press release of reformers on YouTube  RIYADH | Sat Apr 9, 2011 8:12am EDT  (Reuters) – A group of Saudi activists has launched a 10-minute YouTube video protesting against the imprisonment without charge of some Saudi intellectuals which has attracted over 9,000 hits in less than 24 hours.  More…

2010 Human Rights Report, Saudi Arabia Recently Released by the Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor  – 2010 Country Reports on Human Rights Practices  April 8, 2011  Read the Report

Saudi polls, aid sweeteners not enough: activists  By Omar Hasan, AFP March 23, 2011 – The announcement of municipal polls, hot on the heels of a huge economic aid package, may not be enough to spare Saudi Arabia from the upheavals sweeping the Arab world, activists said on Wednesday. More…

Saudi Arabia withdraws Reuters reporter’s permit Sun, Mar 13 2011  L(Reuters) – Saudi Arabia has withdrawn the accreditation of a senior Reuters correspondent, obliging him to leave the country, after officials complained on Tuesday that a recent report on a protest in the kingdom was not accurate. More…

Hundreds Protest in Eastern Saudi Arabia by  Summer Said March 11, 2010 The Wall Street Journal  RIYADH, Saudi Arabia—Hundreds of protesters demonstrated Friday in two eastern Saudi Arabian cities, a day after police broke up a march in that region. More…

Saudi Arabia urged to reverse ban on peaceful protest 10 March 2011   PRESS RELEASE  Amnesty International has called on the Saudi Arabian authorities to reverse the ban on peaceful protest in the Kingdom, amid fears of a violent crackdown on mass demonstrations planned for Friday’s “Day of Rage”. More…

Saudi Arabia: Stop Stifling Peaceful Dissent  :Interior Ministry Reiterates Ban on All Protests, Arrests Protesters March 8, 2011 HRW “By banning all protests Saudi rulers are telling their countrymen and women that for all political purposes they are not citizens and have no right to participate in public affairs. Saudis have had enough of unaccountable rulers telling them to do as they are told and shut up.”  Sarah Leah Whitson, Middle East director at Human Rights Watch (Cairo) – Saudi Arabia should rescind its categorical ban on peaceful demonstrations and release the more than 20 protesters detained on March 3, 2011, in the eastern town of Qatif, Human Rights Watch said today.  More… in English in Arabic

Saudi Arabia: Saudi Arabian teacher arrested for protest Amnesty International MDE 23/007/2011  8 March 2011  A 25-year-old teacher was arrested on 4 March 2011 during a protest held in Riyadh calling for reform. More…

Saudi authorities urged to allow peaceful protests 7 March 2011 Amnesty International has called on the Saudi Arabian government to allow peaceful protests after the authorities confirmed a ban on all demonstrations in the Kingdom. More…

Saudi security forces to crack down on any unlawful protesters From Mohammed Jamjoom, CNN  March 5, 2011   Coming off two days of demonstrations, Saudi Arabia’s Interior Ministry warned Saturday that it would crack down on protesters who continue to take their grievances to the streets.  More…

Protesters call for Saudi to free Shiite detainees: Agence France-Presse  03/05/2011  DUBAI—Several hundred people protested on Friday in the Shiite-majority east of Saudi Arabia, calling for the release of an arrested cleric and other detainees, witnesses said. On Thursday night, 22 people were arrested as police dispersed a protest in Al-Qatif that was demanding the release of prisoners, said Ibrahim al-Mugaiteeb, the president of Human Rights First in Saudi Arabia. “The protesters demanded the liberation of nine ‘forgotten’ prisoners in Al-Qatif, and also of Sheikh al-Aamer, whose picture they carried, and called for national unity between Sunnis and Shiites,” Mugaiteeb told AFP by telephone.  More…

Demonstrators in Saudi Arabia demand prisoners’ release From Mohammed Jamjoom, CNN  March 4, 2011 11:59 a.m. EST   Demonstrators protested in Saudi Arabia’s Eastern Province on Friday to demand the release of Shiite prisoners they feel are being held unjustly.  An outspoken Shiite prayer leader who demonstrators say was arrested last Friday was a focal point of the “day of rage” protest, said Ibrahim al-Mugaiteeb, president of the Human Rights First SocietyMore…

SAUDI ARABIA – From the 2011 Report    In 2010-2011, no human rights NGO managed to obtain legal status. Furthermore,human rights activities continued to be controlled by a vague and draconian legal framework, making human rights defenders vulnerable to arbitrary detention and unfair trials. In addition, peaceful assemblies were banned de facto by the authorities and repressed by the security forces. Finally, the Interior Ministry banned several human rights defenders from leaving the country.

In Saudi Arabia, human rights activities continued to be subj ected to an extremely restrictive framework. Article 39 of the Saudi 1992 Basic Law of Government stipulates that “all acts that foster sedition or division or harm the state’s security and its public relations, shall be prohibited”. This vague definition permits criminalisation of the most basic rights such as the right to freedoms of expression, association or peaceful assembly. Furthermore, the absence of any written criminal code in Saudi Arabia strengthens the climate of insecurity in which human rights defenders are carrying out their work, insofar as there is no formal definition of what constitutes a crime, and no fixed punishment for a specific crime. In addition, Article 112 of the Code of Criminal Procedure allows the Minister of Interior to decide which offences and crimes are punishable by a prison sentence, without specifying its length. The executive power is therefore unlimited to punish any human rights activity.

In this context, no human rights NGO was registered. For example, the NGO Human Rights First Society, Saudi Arabia (HRFS) could never obtain a licence since its setting up in 2002. Similarly, the Saudi Civil and Political Rights Association (ACPRA), set up in 2009, could neither obtain a licence.  More…

 

HRFS STATEMENT     HRFS strongly condemns the illegal arrest of Dr. Mubbarak bin Zuair on March 20, 2011 Om Allaith, wife of Dr. Mubbarak bin Zu air, told HRFS that her husband had a good meeting with His Royal Highness and that Dr. Mubbarak was suppose to break the good news, to thedemonstrators in front of MOI who were protesting the extended illegal detention of their loved ones, that some of the detainees would be released.  At 10:30 AM on March 20,on his way to MOI where the standoff was taking place, Dr. Mubbarak was stopped and arrested by the secret police.  More…

RELEASED 2011/03/09   On 8 March 2011, human rights defenders Messrs Hussain Abdullah al ‘Alq and Hussain Abdullah al Yusuf were released prison after being detained for four days. They had been arrested on the night of 3-4 March 2011 in relation to Shi’a protests in the city of Qatif. More…

SHEIKH TAWFIQ JABER IBRAHIM AL-‘AMR HAS BEEN RELEASED – MARCH 6, 2011  Previous Statement: Saudi Arabia: Shi’a cleric at risk of torture: Sheikh Tawfiq Jaber Ibrahim al-‘Amr : 4 March 2011 Amnesty International. More…

Saudi Arabia: Further information: Protesters released in Saudi Arabia More…

Saudi Arabia: Let Women Vote, Run for Office   No Excuse for Exclusion From Upcoming Municipal Elections (Beirut) – The Saudi government’s refusal to let women vote in municipal elections in September 2011 unlawfully deprives women of their rights to full and equal status under the law, Human Rights Watch said today. Human Rights Watch called on the election committee to allow women to vote and to run for seats on the municipal councils.   More…

Saudi Arabia: Arrests for Peaceful Protest on the Rise   More Than 160 Protesters, Critics Held Without Charge March 27, 2011  HRW (New York) – Saudi Arabia should immediately release protesters and critics arrested and detained without charge over the past weeks, Human Rights Watch said today. More than 100 people have been arrested in the Qatif district, and about 45 in the al-Ahsa’ district, both Shia population centers in the kingdom’s Eastern Province. A smaller number of people have been arrested in Riyadh and Qasim governorates.  More…

ACPRA demands that the MOI release the relatives of recent detainees, who were, on March 20, 2011, asking for information about a loved one.  Statement in Arabic.

URGENT HRFS STATEMENT:  HRFS calls for the immediate release of Mr. Mohammad Albjadi

On Monday, March 21, 2011 Saudi security arrested Mr. Mohammad Salih Albjadi, a 30 year old business man who lives in Buraidah, Qassim.  Mr. Albjadi is married with one young daughter.  His arrest took place in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

HRFS was informed of the arrest by Dr. Abdullah Alhamid who said that Mr. Albjadi was arrested as a result of his participation in the protest with the families who were calling for the release of their illegally detained relatives on March 20.

Human Rights First Society condemns this action taken against Mr. Albjadi by the secret police (Almabahith Alamah) in Saudi Arabia. We call on the Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques King Abdullah bin Abdul-Aziz to intervene for the immediate, unconditional release of Mr. Albjadi and also to protect peaceful activists of the Saudi Civil and Political Rights Association (ACPRA.)  Read More Details…

Human Rights Activist Detained After Protest Amnesty International   March 25, 3022  Mohammad Salih al-Bajadi, a 30-year-old businessman who co-founded a human rights organization in Saudi Arabia, was arrested on 21 March after attending a protest the day before. He has been held incommunicado since, placing him at risk of torture or other ill-treatment.   More…

ACPRA Condemns The Arbitrary Detention of Its Co-Founder: Mohammed Salih Al-Bjady, and Demands His Immediate Unconditional Release Riyadh,  Saudi Arabia   Thursday, March 24, 2011  A large group of armed special forces surrounded Mr. Al-Bjady’s home, blockaded all roads that lead to Al-Bjady’s house, he was then taken by the authority in handcuffs and manacles. Mr. Al-Bjady then was taken to his office in downtown Buraydah where agents searched his business office thoroughly for several hours while he was accompanying them in shackles, this is clearly an attempt to humiliate him and tarnish his reputations. This arbitrary detention of a well-known human rights activist flagrantly violates the Saudi Basic Law of Governance and the Law of the Criminal Procedures. Unfortunately, the Ministry of Interior (MOI) and DGI’s agents have become outlaw by arresting individuals without legal due process of the law. It is ironic that ordinary Saudis demand rule of law, while MOI and DGI violate the law.  More… in Arabic …in English

URGENT HRFS STATEMENT:   Immediate Freedom for the Syrian publisher Dr. Alaaeddin Alrashi

Dr. Alaaeddin Alrashi, a book publisher from Syria, who was invited by the Saudi Ministry of Information to participate in the Riyadh International Book Fair, was kidnapped at 8:00 pm, March 21, 2011, in front of his residence where he was trying to stop a taxi to go with his wife to do some errands. When his wife came down from their flat she did not find her husband; she felt abandoned, afraid and did not know what to do.  Dr. Alaaeddin is 31 with 4 children.

Human Rights First Society deplores and condemns the illegal kidnapping of Dr. Alaaeddin Alrashi, without notifying his wife, a guest from Syria who feels like a stranger in Saudi Arabia.  Read More Details…

URGENT HRFS STATEMENT:  Saudi Government should release 100 Shea protesters in the Eastern Province

During the peaceful protests last week in the Eastern Province, in the Shea populated areas of Safwa, Qatif and its villages and Alhassa 100 protesters were arrested.  The peaceful demonstrators were calling for the release of the Nine Forgotten Shea prisoners from the mid 1990s and were protesting the Gulf forces intervention in Bahrain as well as the crackdown on the demonstrators in Manama and other Bahrain villages.

Human Rights First Society is appalled by the reports that some of these 100 detainees were subjected to physical and psychological torture particularly in Alhassa. Read More Details…

HRFS STATEMENT:  Full Condemnation for the Outrageous Suppression of the Demonstration in Qatif – March 10

HRFS followed closely what happened last night in King Abdulaziz  Street in Qatif where police forces used deplorable force to suppress the  peaceful demonstration and where several demonstrators were injured.

HRFS condemns, with the loudest and clearest words, the use of all kinds of force to disperse demonstrators particularly when live ammunition was used last night against the demonstrators in Qatif. More…  Statement in English

Saudi Arabia: Arrests for Peaceful Protest on the Rise   More Than 160 Protesters, Critics Held Without Charge March 27, 2011  HRW (New York) – Saudi Arabia should immediately release protesters and critics arrested and detained without charge over the past weeks, Human Rights Watch said today. More than 100 people have been arrested in the Qatif district, and about 45 in the al-Ahsa’ district, both Shia population centers in the kingdom’s Eastern Province. A smaller number of people have been arrested in Riyadh and Qasim governorates.  More…

Saudi Arabia: Free Political Activists February 19, 2011  HRW:  Secret Police Crackdown on Founders of First Political Party More…

Saudi Arabia Risks Shiite Unrest in Wake of Bahrain by Henry Meyer February 18, 2011 (Bloomberg) More…

Joint Letter to HRC Member States February 3, 2011.  A joint civil society letter has been sent to the Human Rights Council Member States on Egypt urging the International Community to ensure that rights of Egyptians are upheld.  HRFS is one of the signatories. More…

UN General Assembly should suspend Libya’s UN Human Rights Council February 25, 2011    More…

PROFESSOR RELEASED, NO FURTHER ACTION NEEDED: Law professor Dr Mohammed ‘Abdullah al-‘Abdulkareem was released on 15 February.  More…

ACPRA  (Saudi Civil and Political Rights Association) Declares Its Full Support To The Legitimate Demands of Women’s Sit-In: February 7, 2011  More…

Human Rights Watch   January 24, 2011   HRW has released its World Report 2011 … in English …in Arabic.

Saudi Arabia: Rescind New Online Restrictions: Regulation Subjects Electronic Communications to Government Control – HRW January 7, 2011.   More…in English …in Arabic

Letter Sent on Behalf of Professor Mohammed al Abdulkarim. On January 27, 2010  More…